PDF: Mix Preparation Guidelines via Telegraph Audio Mastering
I read this 3-page PDF some time ago and found it helpful, as it covers a bunch of topics like serial compression on vocals; applying high-pass filters to reduce muddiness; avoiding plug-ins on the final mix bus; file formats and sample rates; headroom; and the importance of preserving song dynamics instead of sacrificing them to loudness.  The PDF was put together by Adam of Telegraph Audio Mastering and is available here.  However, there’s something funky going on with the fonts in that version, so I’ve uploaded my copy of the PDF, which you can download here.


PDF: Mix Preparation Guidelines via Telegraph Audio Mastering

I read this 3-page PDF some time ago and found it helpful, as it covers a bunch of topics like serial compression on vocals; applying high-pass filters to reduce muddiness; avoiding plug-ins on the final mix bus; file formats and sample rates; headroom; and the importance of preserving song dynamics instead of sacrificing them to loudness.  The PDF was put together by Adam of Telegraph Audio Mastering and is available here.  However, there’s something funky going on with the fonts in that version, so I’ve uploaded my copy of the PDF, which you can download here.

Binaural audio

Binaural Audio Heightens the Realism of Stereo Recording

So I’ve been reading a lot about mics lately, and one of the techniques used in the studio to record in stereo is to record with two microphones some distance from the sound source; options include using an X/Y coincident pair, a Mid and Side (MS) pair, a traditional spaced pair pointed at the sound, or even a ORTF spaced pair angled towards the sound source.  Depending on what you need, any of these techniques will lead to a convincing stereo recording.

But QSound Labs took stereo recording to a new frontier in 1996 with their recording of binaural audio—using two mics placed exactly where the two human ears are located.  This makes for an immersive and extremely realistic audio experience, an optical illusion for the eardrum.  In the case of this video, Virtual Barber Shop, you will feel like you are literally in the barber shop yourself.

So plug in some headphones, close your eyes, and be amazed by your brain’s ability to process stereo!

From the Youtube clip:

You’ll need headphones for this to work. Make sure there is no noise around, close your eyes, turn the volume up a little bit, hold and press headphone on your ears for better hearing, play it and enjoy this impressive audio work ( illusion ). Not a screamer not a prank!


Mysterious Flange Solved
One of the basics of sound on sound is that when two identical pieces of music are played at exact the same time, but with one of them delayed ever so slightly, you get the famous flanging effect (a type of phasing effect).  At the waveform level, flanging comes from the sweeping comb filter effect caused by that tiny delay between the two pieces, but it’s not supposed to happen if the two sounds line up exactly.
And yet, a few moments ago, I ran into a mysterious flanging in Logic Pro (in which I make my tunes) when overlaying the two yellow tracks above.  As you can see, the two match up exactly within the cycle region (that green bar up top), so there shouldn’t have been any phasing whatsoever (I confirmed their alignment by zooming in as far as Logic would let me).  
To troubleshoot, I first turned off the Platinum Verb insert in my Vox Aux bus, as well as the Fuzz-Wah I was using.  Still flanging.  
Next, I muted the Aux Send altogether.  Still flanging, so it wasn’t the Aux at all.  
I even tried muting the Stereo Delay on both tracks; not that it should have mattered, since it’s not a Flanger unit, but this, too, yielded no change.  Failing all of this, I solo’ed just the two tracks and kept starting & stopping the cycle loop—and I finally found a clue: sometimes the flanging happened; sometimes it didn’t.  That’s when I isolated the culprit.  
In Logic, when a cycle starts, if there is active audio right before the cycle region, a little bit of that audio is activated during playback.  In my case, a millisecond of audio from the leftmost audio region was spilling (Stereo Delay and all) into the actual cycle region—and that one millisecond of extra audio is all it took to cause flanging, perhaps abetted by the Stereo Delay effect.  After I muted the yellow piece in red, the flanging went away.  Yay!
So, the moral of the story?  Watch out for adjacent audio regions, even they’re outside the cycle region, and beware of flanging if you have two identical audio regions playing simultaneously!

Mysterious Flange Solved

One of the basics of sound on sound is that when two identical pieces of music are played at exact the same time, but with one of them delayed ever so slightly, you get the famous flanging effect (a type of phasing effect).  At the waveform level, flanging comes from the sweeping comb filter effect caused by that tiny delay between the two pieces, but it’s not supposed to happen if the two sounds line up exactly.

And yet, a few moments ago, I ran into a mysterious flanging in Logic Pro (in which I make my tunes) when overlaying the two yellow tracks above.  As you can see, the two match up exactly within the cycle region (that green bar up top), so there shouldn’t have been any phasing whatsoever (I confirmed their alignment by zooming in as far as Logic would let me).  

To troubleshoot, I first turned off the Platinum Verb insert in my Vox Aux bus, as well as the Fuzz-Wah I was using.  Still flanging.  

Next, I muted the Aux Send altogether.  Still flanging, so it wasn’t the Aux at all.  

I even tried muting the Stereo Delay on both tracks; not that it should have mattered, since it’s not a Flanger unit, but this, too, yielded no change.  Failing all of this, I solo’ed just the two tracks and kept starting & stopping the cycle loop—and I finally found a clue: sometimes the flanging happened; sometimes it didn’t.  That’s when I isolated the culprit.  

In Logic, when a cycle starts, if there is active audio right before the cycle region, a little bit of that audio is activated during playback.  In my case, a millisecond of audio from the leftmost audio region was spilling (Stereo Delay and all) into the actual cycle region—and that one millisecond of extra audio is all it took to cause flanging, perhaps abetted by the Stereo Delay effect.  After I muted the yellow piece in red, the flanging went away.  Yay!

So, the moral of the story?  Watch out for adjacent audio regions, even they’re outside the cycle region, and beware of flanging if you have two identical audio regions playing simultaneously!