dannydance:

And here we go! Back in action! Let’s get at re-post if you love the song or any of these dance moves! Subscribe to my channel.  Dance Is A Feeling!!

Reblogged from A Better Dancing Day
dannydance:

If we make it about the music, DJing can be art.

Yes.

dannydance:

If we make it about the music, DJing can be art.

Yes.

Reblogged from Danny Dance
dannydance:

On your mark…

So much new mmmmmusic.

dannydance:

On your mark…

So much new mmmmmusic.

Reblogged from Danny Dance
dannydance:

They say Olympians train an average of 24 hours a week (30 if you’re an elite Olympian like Michael Phelps.  60 if you’re a Greatest-of-All-Timer like Tiger Woods).  24 hours a week breaks down to 3 hours, 25 minutes every single day, 365 days a year.  
If you practice something that much, then after 8 years, you’ll rack up about 10,000 hours of practice.  At that point, you will more or less be world-class at that thing.
I want to be a world-class House Music producer.  Starting today, I’m putting in my 3:25. What do you want to be?  Join me.


(download the hi-res picture at http://bit.ly/325worldclass)

dannydance:

They say Olympians train an average of 24 hours a week (30 if you’re an elite Olympian like Michael Phelps.  60 if you’re a Greatest-of-All-Timer like Tiger Woods).  24 hours a week breaks down to 3 hours, 25 minutes every single day, 365 days a year.  

If you practice something that much, then after 8 years, you’ll rack up about 10,000 hours of practice.  At that point, you will more or less be world-class at that thing.

I want to be a world-class House Music producer.  Starting today, I’m putting in my 3:25. What do you want to be?  Join me.

(download the hi-res picture at http://bit.ly/325worldclass)

Reblogged from Danny Dance

[DIAF005] Before We Had The Time (Radio Edit)

dannydance:

Download some free summer love. The extended DJ edit comes out this Friday, July 27. The Man Who Can Dance returns with a sizzling summer love song, “Before We Had The Time”, the first of many hot singles in the Dance Is A Feeling Records pipeline.  BWHTT features an addictive groove with a classic feel, a foot-stomping vocal, and a mid-song drop designed to make you lose your mind in delight.  Never straying far from its feel-good story, the track delivers a chest-pounding ode to the feeling, awe, and love we all feel in the summertime, delivered in that unique, bassy Danny Dance style.

Song structure:

Pre-intro “better believe it, babe” - Intro (16) - Verse (16) - Bridge (16) - Verse (16) - Breakdown (8) - Buildup (8) - Chorus (16) - Bridge (2) - Chorus (12) - Bridge (2)

Reblogged from Danny Dance
dancetipshd:

abetterdancingday:

dannydance:

So there I am, happily dancing into the dusk on the beach, swaying to the House Music in my headphones as I House Dance on the boardwalk (which I do daily before making music each night), when I suddenly feel the flick of two fingers on my face. A female bicyclist had decide that me dancing in the amply wide boardwalk merited a subtle slap in the face. A lane so big, on a boardwalk so wide, that five dancers and five bikes could together not take up the entire thing. It was a stupid thing for her to do, taking advantage of her motion on a bike to strike me as she kept riding.
So imagine the surprised look on her face when I caught up to her 150 meters down the path, to give her a large piece of my mind. Her bike lost to my cardio; her action lost to my words.
Everybody along the strip was impressed. Including her.

Haha. Dance cardio for the win! ;)

LOL! I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: dancetip 001:
“In House Dance, the quads burn up FAST. Try to jog 4x a week!” ;)


The modern producer must be well-rounded, ready to tackle any challenge—in and out of the production studio ;).  Seriously, though, it’s important to stay healthy and fit, even if you spend a lot of time in your DAWs making music.  

dancetipshd:

abetterdancingday:

dannydance:

So there I am, happily dancing into the dusk on the beach, swaying to the House Music in my headphones as I House Dance on the boardwalk (which I do daily before making music each night), when I suddenly feel the flick of two fingers on my face. A female bicyclist had decide that me dancing in the amply wide boardwalk merited a subtle slap in the face. A lane so big, on a boardwalk so wide, that five dancers and five bikes could together not take up the entire thing. It was a stupid thing for her to do, taking advantage of her motion on a bike to strike me as she kept riding.

So imagine the surprised look on her face when I caught up to her 150 meters down the path, to give her a large piece of my mind. Her bike lost to my cardio; her action lost to my words.

Everybody along the strip was impressed. Including her.

Haha. Dance cardio for the win! ;)

LOL! I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: dancetip 001:

“In House Dance, the quads burn up FAST. Try to jog 4x a week!” ;)

dancetipsHD 001: Cardio

The modern producer must be well-rounded, ready to tackle any challenge—in and out of the production studio ;).  Seriously, though, it’s important to stay healthy and fit, even if you spend a lot of time in your DAWs making music.  

Reblogged from dancetipsHD
dannydance:

Time can buy experience, and money can buy knowledge, but nothing can buy the joy of making music.

Some mags I just picked up. A few articles are cross-posted, but I think the knowledge in these two bookazines are well worth the $52.98 total. Here’s to what these 268 pages will do for your music.P.S. Follow me on my artist Tumblr, http://dannydance.com

dannydance:

Time can buy experience, and money can buy knowledge, but nothing can buy the joy of making music.

Some mags I just picked up. A few articles are cross-posted, but I think the knowledge in these two bookazines are well worth the $52.98 total. Here’s to what these 268 pages will do for your music.

P.S. Follow me on my artist Tumblr, http://dannydance.com

Reblogged from Danny Dance
I can’t overstate how helpful Chocolate Puma’s Studio section is over on their blog!  Even though they only have a handful of articles, they are extremely helpful.  This Match EQ Tutorial was particularly helpful, though I’ll warn you that sidechaining your bass to the kick drum for Template Learn/Match purposes (see their step by step instrux) really takes the wind out of the bass, even at a low Apply Percentage like 17%.  This means you’ll definitely have to add 1 or 2 additional bass layers to pack enough oomph in there.  Well worth what it does to carving out problem frequencies, though!
From 
Studio Tips: Separating two sounds with Logic’s Match EQ by Chocolate Puma


Say you got a fat kick drum and on top of that a fat bass line. They both sound great if you solo them, but tend to clash when you play them both at the same time.
There are a few tricks to separate them. Most of the time you decide which one of the two is covering the sub frequencies, and which one is covering the higher bass frequencies. So say your kick has the most energy at 60hz and your bass line the most energy at 100hz, then you can be sure that you’re quite safe.
But what if you have trouble separating the two with just using your regular EQ? And what if you want to have a really low subby kick AND a really low subby bass line? Of course you could sidechain the bass line with a compressor. Or program your bass line, so that it doesn’t play at the same time as your kick drum.
But there’s another way: For example in our remix for ‘Mike Dunn’s Gitcho House On‘ we wanted to have both a low kick AND a sub bass line, the bass line played at the same time as the kick, and sidechaining wasn’t sufficient.
Bring on Logic’s Match EQ:
1. Put Match EQ on your bass line channel.
2. Go to the upper right hand side and choose your kick drum channel at the Side Chain dropdown menu.
3. Click ‘Template Learn’, press play and let Match EQ learn the characteristics of your kick.
4. Press stop, set your Side Chain to ‘None’.
5. Click ‘Current Learn’, press play and let Match EQ learn the characteristics of your bass line.
6. Click ‘Material Match’.
7. Set ‘Phase’ to ‘Minimal’ (especially with low frequencies this is important, if you use it to separate higher sounds, use ‘Linear’)
8. Slide ‘Apply’ to a minimal value (say -20% or something).
9. Use ‘Smoothing’ to fine tune.
10. Use Fade Extremes to cancel out frequencies you don’t want to be affected (click the triangle in the lower left hand corner to unfold).
Presto, you just separated your bass line from your kick drum!
Now you can also use this method to separate strings from a vocal. Or if you use a positive value at step 8, to match one sound to another sound.

I can’t overstate how helpful Chocolate Puma’s Studio section is over on their blog!  Even though they only have a handful of articles, they are extremely helpful.  This Match EQ Tutorial was particularly helpful, though I’ll warn you that sidechaining your bass to the kick drum for Template Learn/Match purposes (see their step by step instrux) really takes the wind out of the bass, even at a low Apply Percentage like 17%.  This means you’ll definitely have to add 1 or 2 additional bass layers to pack enough oomph in there.  Well worth what it does to carving out problem frequencies, though!

From 

Studio Tips: Separating two sounds with Logic’s Match EQ by Chocolate Puma

Say you got a fat kick drum and on top of that a fat bass line. They both sound great if you solo them, but tend to clash when you play them both at the same time.

There are a few tricks to separate them. Most of the time you decide which one of the two is covering the sub frequencies, and which one is covering the higher bass frequencies. So say your kick has the most energy at 60hz and your bass line the most energy at 100hz, then you can be sure that you’re quite safe.

But what if you have trouble separating the two with just using your regular EQ? And what if you want to have a really low subby kick AND a really low subby bass line? Of course you could sidechain the bass line with a compressor. Or program your bass line, so that it doesn’t play at the same time as your kick drum.

But there’s another way: For example in our remix for ‘Mike Dunn’s Gitcho House On‘ we wanted to have both a low kick AND a sub bass line, the bass line played at the same time as the kick, and sidechaining wasn’t sufficient.

Bring on Logic’s Match EQ:

1. Put Match EQ on your bass line channel.

2. Go to the upper right hand side and choose your kick drum channel at the Side Chain dropdown menu.

3. Click ‘Template Learn’, press play and let Match EQ learn the characteristics of your kick.

4. Press stop, set your Side Chain to ‘None’.

5. Click ‘Current Learn’, press play and let Match EQ learn the characteristics of your bass line.

6. Click ‘Material Match’.

7. Set ‘Phase’ to ‘Minimal’ (especially with low frequencies this is important, if you use it to separate higher sounds, use ‘Linear’)

8. Slide ‘Apply’ to a minimal value (say -20% or something).

9. Use ‘Smoothing’ to fine tune.

10. Use Fade Extremes to cancel out frequencies you don’t want to be affected (click the triangle in the lower left hand corner to unfold).

Presto, you just separated your bass line from your kick drum!

Now you can also use this method to separate strings from a vocal. Or if you use a positive value at step 8, to match one sound to another sound.